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The Horror of Horror Movies  

Horror films are on the rise.

A decade ago, horror movies represented just under six percent of American movies. Today, they make up 13 percent of our big-screen offerings.

M3GAN, a movie about a murderous doll controlled by artificial intelligence, has now brought in more than 175 million dollars since its January 6 release.

I was intrigued by a recent Wall Street Journal article announcing that movie studios plan to release—get this—29 more horror films by the end of 2023.

Tension and shock are potent tools in storytelling of any kind. But celebrating gore and all things gruesome is different. When you look at the emerging statistics on mental health in America, you have to scratch your head at society’s inability (unwillingness?) to connect today’s generation of emotionless killers with the surge in horror movies.

Why would we not create a society with mental health issues when young children—toddlers—are exposed to scenes where knives puncture bodies, chainsaws remove limbs, and heads are severed? How could we not have a warped attitude toward slashing, bashing, and burning?

The question, of course, is why? Why the fascination with horror movies? I have no research—only a hunch. As our culture grows evil, so grows our fascination with evil. That’s what decaying souls do. I would argue that the rise of horror movies contributes to the decline of our culture—and nation.

In John 3:19, Jesus observed, “Men loved darkness rather than light because their deeds were evil.” And that is the real horror of horror movies.

 

 

 

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Jon GaugerJon Gauger

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